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Helping Children Cope with Sudden Death and Bereavement

dc.contributor.authorOladimeji, B. Y.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-03T13:57:28Z
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-27T10:23:42Z
dc.date.available2014-09-03T13:57:28Z
dc.date.available2018-10-27T10:23:42Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationIn Osinowo, Helen Okhiaofe [et al.] (eds.) Sudden Death in Nigeria: Psychological Perspective: Analysis of causes, grief processes and treatment. Ibadan: Stirling-Horden Publishersen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://localhost:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/41
dc.description.abstractThe certainty of death in human experience is one of the central concepts in almost all human philosophies. Sudden death is dreaded because there is usually no warning and possibility of its avoidance. In some cultures, it is a taboo subject with children, even when it has happened perhaps because of the desire to protect our children from anything unpleasant. Death is a serious threat to children. It undermines their idea that the world is a "safe place". The sudden death of a loved one is a terrible shock and gives no one the time to prepare the child. Adults are usually more preoccupied with their own loss and often forget to pay attention to the child's reaction. Invariably children are often confused with stories of the dead person "traveling to buy something for the child" or "gone to be with Jesus" and so on.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectDeath in childrenen_US
dc.subjectDeathen_US
dc.subjectMourning reaction in childrenen_US
dc.subjectGrief reactions in childrenen_US
dc.titleHelping Children Cope with Sudden Death and Bereavementen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.coverage.geographicalNigeriaen_US
dc.departmentMental Healthen_US
dc.facultiesHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.format.filetypePDFen_US
dc.pages.totalpages7en_US


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