Family-focused intervention on male spousal involvement in matternity care in selected teaching hospitals in South-West Nigeria.

Ogidan, Oluwakemi Christie (2014)

xiii, 88 pages

Thesis

This study explored the impact of family focused intervention package on acceptance of male spousal involvement in maternity care among couples in two University Teaching Hospitals. It evaluated couples’ knowledge about roles of men in maternity care; determine couples’ acceptance of male spousal involvement in maternity care; and determine the impact of educational intervention on male spousal willingness to participate in intrapartal care; couples’ knowledge and acceptance of roles of men in maternity care. Simple randomization was employed to select two teaching hospitals and purposive sampling technique was used to select sixty eight (68) subjects. Quasi-experimental design was employed using questionnaire to explore information on each couple’s demographics, knowledge of roles of men in maternity care and acceptance of male spousal involvement in maternity care. An educational package was used to educate the couples in the study group. Analysis of data was done using appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. The results of the study revealed that majority (73.1%) of the couples have good knowledge of roles of men in all aspects of maternity care. However, above average (51%) of study and control groups did not want male partners to accompany female partners to antenatal clinic while 54% of the two groups will not want husbands to support spouse psychologically during delivery by staying with her. This study also revealed that men and women partially accepted male spousal involvement in majority of maternity activities as the average Likert scale score is 3.7 although the two groups did not accepted that husbands should support spouse psychologically during delivery by staying with her as the average likert score is less than 3. The educational intervention made a significant impact on willingness of male partner to participate in intrapartal care, as all (100%) of the male partner in study group enter into the labour room with their wives and participated in rendering the intrapartal care and there was a significant improvement in knowledge and acceptance of study group after the intervention. The hypothesis tested showed that there is no significant difference between the two groups’ knowledge and acceptance of roles of men in maternity care at pre-intervention. It further revealed a significant difference of p < 0.0001 in couple’s knowledge and acceptance at pre and post-interventions for the study group. In conclusion, the result of the study revealed that couples are fairly knowledgeable about roles of men in maternity care. Above average of the couples accepted male involvement in maternity care, the male partners are willing with further enlightenment to participate in intrapartal care and the knowledge and acceptance can be improved with good sensitization.

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