Department of Child Dental Health- Journal Articles

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    Open Access
    General anxiety, dental anxiety, digit sucking, caries and oral hygiene status of children resident in a semi-urban population in Nigeria
    (Springer Nature, 2018-04-20) Morenike O. Folayan; Kikelomo A. Kolawole; Nneka K. Onyejaka; Hakeem O. Agbaje; Nneka M. Chukwumah; Titus A. Oyedele
    Digit sucking can represent untreated anxiety or other emotional problems. The aim of this study was to determine if digit sucking is a predictor of general anxiety and dental anxiety; and if general and dental anxiety are associated with caries and oral hygiene status of children resident in sub-urban Nigeria.
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    Open Access
    Challenges with study procedure fidelity when conducting household survey: reports from the field.
    (BMC Research Notes, 2019-08-07T00:00:00Z) Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Alade, Micheal O; Oziegbe, Elizabeth O
    The aim of the study was to identify reasons for protocol deviations during conduct of large epidemiological surveys despite training of field workers, validating clinicians, and providing field supervisory support. Enquiries focused on breaches of recruitment procedures, privacy, confidentiality, and informed consent. The case study was a household survey conducted in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
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    Open Access
    Changes in the prevalence of dental caries in primary school children in Lagos State, Nigeria.
    (Original Article, 2014) Sofola, O O; Folayan, M O; Oginni, A B
    Objectives: To evaluate the changes in the prevalence of dental caries in Lagos State over a 3 years period and the role of age, sex, and playing in the changes observed. Materials and Methods: Three primary schools in Lagos State, Nigeria were randomly selected for the study. Six hundred and thirty‑three children age 2-12 years, were examined for caries in 2000 while 513 children were examined in 2003. The prevalence of tooth decay and the prevalence of untreated tooth decay were calculated for the two years, that is, 2000 and 2003. Also the degree of unmet treatment need among the population with caries experience was measured. Differences in the prevalence and severity of dental caries in the primary and permanent dentition were assessed. Results: Approximately 18% of children had untreated tooth decay in their primary dentition in 2003: A 26.1% increase from 2000. About 12.0% of the decay, extracted, and filled teeth (deft) index was seen with decayed teeth in 2000 and 16.6% in 2003. Extracted primary teeth decreased from 2.5% in 2000 to 1.5% in 2003. The change in mean deft between 2000 (0.42) and 2003 (0.47) was 11.9%. Over the study period, the overall reduction in the prevalence of dental caries was 34.8% in the permanent dentition. The decline was larger among children aged 5-9 years (62.1%) and among females (75%). Conclusion: The study showed no overall changes in caries severity but a decrease in caries prevalence in the permanent dentition over the study period. The largest decline in caries prevalence in the permanent dentition was observed in children aged 5-9 years and females. On the contrary, there was an increase in the caries prevalence in the primary dentition.
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    Open Access
    Association between malocclusion, caries and oral hygiene in children 6 to 12 years old resident in suburban Nigeria
    (BMC Oral Health, 2019) Kikelomo Adebanke Kolawole; Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan
    Background: There are conflicting opinions about the contribution of malocclusions to the development of dental caries and periodontal disease. This study’s aim was to determine the association between specific malocclusion traits, caries, oral hygiene and periodontal health for children 6 to 12 years old. Methods: The study was a household survey. The presence of malocclusion traits was assessed in 495 participants. The caries status and severity were assessed with the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft/DMFT) index and the pulpal involvement, ulceration, fistula and abscess (pufa/PUFA) index. The Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) and Gingival Index (GI) were used to assess periodontal health. The association between malocclusion traits, the presence of caries, poor oral hygiene, and poor gingival health were determined with chi square and logistic regression analyses. Statistical significance was inferred at p < 0.05. Results: Seventy-four (14.9%) study participants had caries, with mean (SD) dmft/DMFT scores of 0.27 (0.82) and 0.07 (0.39), respectively, and mean (SD) pufa/PUFA index scores of 0.09 (0.43) and 0.02 (0.20), respectively. The mean (SD) OHI-S score was 1.56 (0.74) and mean (SD) GI score was 0.90 (0.43). Dental Aesthetic Index scores ranged from 13 to 48 with a mean (SD) score of 20.7 (4.57). Significantly greater proportions of participants with crowding (p = 0.026) and buccal crossbite (p = 0.009) had caries. Significantly more children with increased overjet (p = 0.003) and anterior open bite (p = 0.008) had moderate to severe gingivitis. Poor oral hygiene (OR: 1.83; CI: 1.05–3.18 p = 0.033), crowding (OR: 1.97; CI: 1.01–3.49; p = 0.021) and buccal crossbite (OR: 6.57; CI: 1.51–28.51 p = 0.012) significantly increased the odds of having caries. Poor oral hygiene (p < 0.001), increased overjet (p = 0.003), and anterior open bite (p = 0.014) were the only significant traits associated with gingivitis.
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    Open Access
    Community stakeholder engagement during a vaccine demonstration project in Nigeria: lessons on implementation of the good participatory practice guidelines.
    (Pan African Medical Journal, 2019) Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Durueke, Florita; Gofwen, Wika; Godo-Odemijie, Godwin; Okonkwo, Chuks; Nanmak, Bali; Osawe, Sophia; Okporoko, Evaezi; Abimiku, Alash'le
    To report on the successes and challenges with implementing the good participatory practice guidelines for the Nigerian Canadian Collaboration on AIDS Vaccine (NICCAV) project. An open and close ended questionnaire was administered to 25 randomly selected community stakeholders on the project. The questions sought information on perception about the community entry, constitution and function of the community advisory board (CAB) and community based organization (CBO), media engagement process, and research literacy programmes. The quantitative and qualitative data were analysed and findings triangulated. The project exceeded its targets on CBO engagement and community members reached. Stakeholders had significant improvement in knowledge about HIV vaccine research design and implementation (p=0.004). All respondents felt satisfied with the community entry, CAB constitution process, function and level of media engagement; 40% were satisfied with the financial support provided; 70% felt the community awareness and education coverage was satisfactory; and 40% raised concerns about the study site selection with implications for study participants' recruitment. The NICCAV community stakeholder engagement model produced satisfactory outcomes for both researchers and community stakeholders. The inclusion of an advocacy and monitoring plan enabled it to identify important challenges that were of ethical concerns for the study.